Fahrenheit first doc released theatrically in Middle East

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will you go see this film

yes
6
67%
no
3
33%
 
Total votes : 9

Fahrenheit first doc released theatrically in Middle East

Postby beentheredonethat » Thu Jun 24, 2004 9:15 pm

for all the disbelievers in America in the power of the ugly truth...expect this film to sell out all over the ME.



United Arab Emirates based Front Row Entertainment is planning to release Michael Moore’s Fahrenheit 9/11 in the Middle East beginning on July 14 according to managing director Gianluca Chacra.

The film will first be sent out on 18 screens in the United Arab Emirates and will be released in Syria (2 screens), Jordan (3 screens), Lebanon (10 screens) and Egypt (5 screens) six days later on July 20.

Other territories which Front Row will handle include Kuwait, Qatar, Oman, Bahrain and Saudi Arabia – however, all of the above countries are awaiting censorship clearance.
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Postby Sri Lanky » Thu Jun 24, 2004 9:26 pm

This film will solidify even more resistance to the criminal Bush administration. Yeah!
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Postby crotalus01 » Thu Jun 24, 2004 9:33 pm

Saudi Arabia? i have read they have no theaters to release it in...except maybe the House of Saud private screening room...anyone know? always had read that it was one of the only countries in the world where films were generally banned.
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Postby Medevac » Thu Jun 24, 2004 9:35 pm

Maybe I will get to see this movie after all.
The crowd reaction over here should be worth the price of admission alone.
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Postby crotalus01 » Thu Jun 24, 2004 10:00 pm

Saudi Arabia today may be finding a way to make life more attractive than death for young Saudi Arabian men. It will not be easy.
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For the great majority of young Saudi Arabian men, who are not rich, life is truly grim. Even speaking to young girls can, literally, produce a lashing, and they may not be able to afford a wife. They cannot enjoy a beer with friends in a pub or bar - there are none. They cannot go to a disco - there are none. They cannot go to a movie theater - there are none. They cannot go to a concert - there are none. Even the physical aspect of this country is grim. They are not surrounded by beauty. In addition, given Saudi Arabia's staggering birth rate and unemployment rate, they are unlikely to find a job - or, at least, one providing any interest or satisfaction.
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What can young Saudi Arabian men do? Essentially, two things. They can watch television, which, every day, shows them vivid and appalling images of "Zionists" and "crusaders" killing, brutalizing or otherwise humiliating Muslims (true images, unfortunately). And they can wholeheartedly embrace their country's mandatory and austere interpretation of Islam, which emphasizes that this life is inconsequential in comparison with the life to come - except in terms of assuring by one's acts the best possible place in the next life, in which places of honor, and the most attractive living conditions, are reserved for "martyrs."
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As psychologists know, arguments for suicide are more compelling to young people than to their elders, because the young still tend to think "magically" about the future.
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For frustrated young men facing thwarted lives without pleasure or hope, a spectacular death can seem a magical escape. Aspiring Muslims can believe that "martyrdom" will lead directly to a paradise whose sumptuous and erotic pleasures are the classic fantasies of adolescent dreams.
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Young people do not need to be Saudi Arabian, Muslim or even religious to be tempted by a magical suicidal solution to their problems. But the unusual social and religious environment of Saudi Arabia and the intensification of the long-running Israeli and Western practices of conquest, colonization, occupation and humiliation, of which Muslims are so visibly the victims, combine to make young Saudi Arabian men particularly prone to this tragic temptation.
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The preferred ways to seek martyrdom are currently to die fighting for the "liberation" of Palestine or Iraq. A respected, gray-bearded Saudi Arabian friend, who was born in Iraq, has been approached in mosques by children as young as 10 seeking his help to infiltrate them into Iraq so that they can die fighting the Americans. He tries to discourage them, but, as he freely admits, the young no longer pay attention to members of his generation, who are held in contempt - even by their own sons and daughters - for their perceived impotence against Israel and America.
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The borders of Saudi Arabia are closed, however. So the only alternative for most of those seeking martyrdom is to strike a blow against "evil" at home.
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Evil is, of course, a subjective concept, but those in the Middle East or in America who view the world in terms of good and evil have the utmost confidence that they know it when they see it, and that God is on their side. In Saudi Arabia, "evil" looks like me - or like the representatives of a Saudi regime widely perceived as more concerned about pleasing people like me than about pleasing its own people.
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What might make life more attractive than death for young Saudi Arabian men? The twin occupations of Palestine and Iraq - and the related humiliations of Muslims - might end through successful resistance, restoring a shared sense of dignity, self-respect and pride to Muslims. Or Saudi Arabian society might turn away from religion, with people increasingly focused on living this life decently - and even pleasantly - for its own sake. Neither seems likely in the near term.
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In these circumstances, there is every reason to expect that attacks like those in Khobar will increase in frequency, carried out by young men fired by rage, hate and a yearning for a better life in another world.
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John V. Whitbeck is an international lawyer based in Saudi Arabia.


 okay so according to this site and several others i have searched, there are zero movie theaters in Saudia Arabia. this might be problematic for Farenheit 9/11 which supposedly is scheduled tenatively to open there....
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Postby WillyBlues » Thu Jun 24, 2004 10:08 pm

What about the net and dvd players? are they banned as well, I always considered technology to be the great equalizer
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Postby Medevac » Thu Jun 24, 2004 10:18 pm

The net and DVD is available BUT:
DVDs are censored. Extended kissing, references to God andnudity scenes worthy of a Cliff Richard video are all cut. Its worth noting that the most cut film was 'Bruce Almighty', with all refernces to God cut out. I think it lasted about 20 minutes.

The net is on a State run ISP with a hypersensitive net nanny. Same here in the UAE) sites ranging from albinocamelshgger.com through to middlesexuniversity.com are banned.
This message http://proxy.emirates.net.ae/ is what you get when you try and access anything deemed to be immoral here in the UAE.
This means I haven't seen any porn since the invention of the boob job.
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Postby WillyBlues » Thu Jun 24, 2004 11:15 pm

thanks for the info med and bummer about your lack of porn status. I've always thought that in any kind of exceedingly repressive society there must be some breakdown of authority, or in some cases, a goverment sanctioned breakdown(oxymoron there) that would at least work as a pressure release valve.

Guess not.
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