MacPac Utopia

Cameras, Computers, PDA, and Vehicles. Travel and non-travel related.

Moderator: coldharvest

MacPac Utopia

Postby Arctic » Tue Dec 14, 2004 10:51 am

http://www.macpac.co.nz/products/displa ... /diid,376/

This pack is new and quite pricey... plus it doesn't seem to be available most places, necessitating delivery straight from Kiwi-land.

Has anyone tried this? Any good? Seems bulky, but then again, seems ideal for a month in Central Asia, mountains and cities and crap.

Any advice? I'm wondering if it's worth the $500... I know Macpac generally produces really durable stuff, and this comes with a bladder and everything.
User avatar
Arctic
BFCus Regularus
 
Posts: 826
Joined: Fri Apr 30, 2004 11:38 am
Location: Cairo, Egypt

Postby Plimsoll » Tue Dec 14, 2004 10:05 pm

Arctic,

I have the smaller Macpac called the Genesis. But my brother has had a Utopia for the last few years and I can testify that both have undergone a beating and survived, they're very durable. One thing I would say about the Utopia is it aint exactly small. Good if you want to take everything but the kitchen sink with you, but when full can be quite heavy to lug around. That said, the harness the Macpacs have is easily up to the job. Suppose it depends on how much you carry around. I don't carry a lot and have being using one of these for the past year for most things:

http://www.macpac.co.nz/products/display/catalogue/do,displayitem-view/mid,69/miid,2325/diid,616/

Whether its worth $500, depends on how much money you have in the first place. If you can afford it, I'd say its as good as you'll get anywhere in terms of a pack which is equally suitable for travel and hiking etc. I've only experience with a few other cheaper brands and they always seem to fall apart.
Plimsoll
 
Posts: 11
Joined: Sat Aug 28, 2004 4:17 am

Postby DawnC71 » Mon Dec 20, 2004 12:46 am

yeah i am looking fo similar luggage right now. I need something around the 3,000 to 4,000 cubic centimeter capacity.

But WOW...500 bucks seems like a lot, but if it is as durable as Plimsoll says then it might be worth it especially for those areas where durability is a necessity. ...i will do some searching arctic and see if I can find something comparable, though. Always good to shop around you know.

Cheers,
Dawn
Passion is necessity. It is not diligence, or simply being committed to a goal. Passion consumes you while you chase down your goal. Passion should always be your natural state of mind for it is what sparks momentum and sets the pace.
User avatar
DawnC71
BFCus Regularus
 
Posts: 578
Joined: Thu Mar 25, 2004 11:17 pm
Location: stickitupyourarsenya

Postby DawnC71 » Mon Dec 20, 2004 1:08 am

Image


although it might be a little too big at a capacity of between 5200 cubic inches to 5500 cubic inches...but not a bad deal for 299.97 and North Face products are fairly durable....of course, I would personally mar the "North Face" emblem and make it look like just any generic pack as well.



Color: (pack/trim) TNF Navy/Black.
Sizes: Medium, Large.

Features The North Face Pivotal Suspension System™- Works with the body's movement to constantly and evenly transfer the pack's load to the hips. This results in more comfortable and efficient backpacking.

Balance- The Load Equalizer is the pivoting link that enables load transfer- regardless of the natural pelvic adjustments the body makes to create balance during movement.
Comfort and Efficiency- The Lumbar Strut system mimics your body's adjustments, allowing the suspension to lengthen and serve as a stabilizing, shock-absorbing system. The Lumbar Strut ensures that the load remains balanced from side to side as you walk, run, ski, climb, or jump. Your pack remains close to and centered on your back.
Freedom of Movement- Carbon Composite Flex Arms adjust with each step you take, making sure that the pack load is transferred evenly from the pack to your body, no matter what position you're in.
Pack Features:
Molded foam backpanel with breathable Airmesh fabrics.
Fully adjustable torso length with interchangeable hipbelt.
D-zip side panel access.
Removable lid converts to waist pack.
Mesh pocket on inside of side-access panel.
Sleeping bag compartment accessible from the side.
Collapsible sleeping bag divider.
Hypalon daisy chains access from front and side.
Expandable side pockets.
Hydration system compatible. (hydration system not included)
Adjustable load lifters with two locations on pack body.
Side water bottle pockets.
Passion is necessity. It is not diligence, or simply being committed to a goal. Passion consumes you while you chase down your goal. Passion should always be your natural state of mind for it is what sparks momentum and sets the pace.
User avatar
DawnC71
BFCus Regularus
 
Posts: 578
Joined: Thu Mar 25, 2004 11:17 pm
Location: stickitupyourarsenya

Postby ROB » Mon Dec 20, 2004 1:48 am

My first pack was almost as big as that Macpac and was almost as expensive.

My next pack was smaller than most day packs and cost me about $40. I got sick of it cos it was too big and thus heavy.

Now I have upgraded to an even smaller pack that cost me $10. It was originally designed as a laptop backpack. Best pack I ever owned.

When it comes to packs, bigger and more expensive ain't usually better unless you're doing some serious mountaineering.
User avatar
ROB
BFCus Regularus
 
Posts: 5150
Joined: Thu Mar 25, 2004 3:49 am

Postby nick » Mon Dec 20, 2004 2:39 am

I would check out Arc Teryx. I'm of the opinion they make some of the best products on the planet. Some other good pack makers: Gregory, Lowe Alpine, Dana.

Be careful of the North Face stuff nowadays. I've seen a noticeable decline in quality of their products latey. They still make some sick stuff, but just make sure. They have this tendency to add a lot of un-needed bells and whistles to their packs.

Like Rob said, you don't really need a big, expensive pack. I bought an old 'potato sack' for 10$. It's an old Lowe Alpine. It's a super back. Good for summit assaults and packing light.

My newest pack is the Bora 30. Sick pack, check it out.
nick
Baron Samedi
 
Posts: 656
Joined: Thu Apr 08, 2004 10:55 pm
Location: Port-au-Prince, Haiti

Postby Plimsoll » Mon Dec 20, 2004 2:59 am

You guys are looking at some pretty big packs, 80+ litres is huge amount of room for most things. The only time I really use my biggest pack (85-95lt macpac) is when I'm going bush for a week or more and carrying tents, supplies etc for the entire time. Usually for more than just me.

My packing has got better and I can now enough gear for most travel, rockclimbing trips etc into my smaller 45Lt pack, with room to spare. Its heaps easier to carry and nothing protrudes over shoulder height, or out the sides, this avoids snags and clothes-lining yourself when ducking under trees etc. You can also run, or at least jog with it without looking like a waddling duck or collapsing under the weight at the end of 50m.

The major difference I find between say a $50 and a few hundred dollar pack of this size, is the harness/shaped back support. It makes hiking etc a lot more comfortable when the weight is properly supported. Also, when you're all hot and sweaty, you don't have an bag clinging to your back like a limpet, adding to the discomfort. Call me a wuss, but it really can make things much easier if you're doing anything more than just carrying things from one hotel room to another, although more a bit expensive when it inevitably gets nicked. I've blacked out all the colour panels and logos on my pack to to minimise the wank factor a tad. Although it probably won't, I hope it makes it slightly less appealing for theives when compared to the brand-spanking new North Face or Deuter packs it'll inevitably end up sitting next to on the roof of the bus.

If you really need the space, I reckon the Karrimor Sabre 60/100 is the go. I almost brought one. A rockclimbing buddie of mine had one and reckoned it was an awesome pack. It has 20lt expansion pockets on each side to carry any extra crap you pick up on your travels. Yet the main 60lt pack is small enough to fit your stuff and carry without being too obtrusive - quite versatile i reckon. Still a bit pricey though, shop around.

have a look: http://www.edirectory.co.uk/pf/pages/moreinfoa.asp?pe=FCJCBQ_+Karrimor+Sabre+60+100+Rucksack&cid=880
Plimsoll
 
Posts: 11
Joined: Sat Aug 28, 2004 4:17 am

Postby DawnC71 » Mon Dec 20, 2004 3:18 am

yeah I am looking for a pretty big pack as I plan to be gone from home and spending alot of time outdoors for several months...but I will agree that big is not often better.

I will take heed of the advice about North face though Nick.

Thanks,
Dawn
Passion is necessity. It is not diligence, or simply being committed to a goal. Passion consumes you while you chase down your goal. Passion should always be your natural state of mind for it is what sparks momentum and sets the pace.
User avatar
DawnC71
BFCus Regularus
 
Posts: 578
Joined: Thu Mar 25, 2004 11:17 pm
Location: stickitupyourarsenya

Postby Hayduke » Thu Dec 23, 2004 12:00 pm

I treated myself and the wife n kids to new packs last spring. I picked an Osprey Aether75 for myself. It's got a capacity of 4500 cubes, larger than what I was looking for at the time, i wanted one that carried about 3000. This Osprey has multiple fastex type buckles for the compression straps so a small loa can be cinched down pretty tight so the pack has some versatility. The best pack i ever owned was a Bergans of Norway. That pack was tough, practically nuke proof. But it got stolen along with all the gear inside. I'd like another but i don't live near a dealer and I refuse to buy packs mail order. I make it a point to go to the outfitter to get packs, boots, and some clothing items, that way i can try them on and insure a proper fit. Enjoy your hikes everybody.
Hayduke
BFCus Regularus
 
Posts: 158
Joined: Mon Apr 19, 2004 1:15 pm

Postby daviduri » Fri Dec 24, 2004 10:06 pm

Deleted post.
Last edited by daviduri on Fri May 05, 2006 2:14 am, edited 1 time in total.
daviduri
 

Postby Lotus7Productions » Wed Dec 29, 2004 4:50 am

I'm reading a book right now titled _Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel_ by Rolf Potts, and he suggest for ANY sort of world travel, to use nothing more than a small day pack for EVERYTHING. I found this a little absurd, and I read a little more, and he makes quite a convincing argument for packing almost nothing. I've found in travelling with different people, that most people bring way too much. A few drab t-shirts and pants, with one outfit for a night out is all I need for clothes. Plus a few urban and non-urban survival kits incase things get hairy, and my camera of course. Its an expensive digital camera, but I'm not too worried about getting it stolen, because I'm not TOO attached to my belongings. You're not your fucking khakis.

However, the author also mentions to keep all your money in a money belt, which I found a little too close to Lonely Planet dribble. As anyone who has read ANY RYP knows that thieves are more than aware of the money belt, and to keep your money in a sowed pocket on the inside of your pants or britches. I recommend the read despite.

I've had a 4000 Jansport pack for about 6 years now, and I've found that it has done really well for all my ventures into the Colorado Rockies and 14er camping trips, as well as all ventures overseas.
User avatar
Lotus7Productions
BFCus Regularus
 
Posts: 420
Joined: Mon Jun 14, 2004 12:05 am
Location: Denver, USA


Return to Gear

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

cron